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Early CRT monitoring using time-domain optical coherence tomography does not add to visual acuity for predicting visual loss in patients with central retinal vein occlusion treated with Intravitreal Ranibizumab: A secondary analysis of trial data
Retina: The Journal of Retinal and Vitreous Diseases
  • Katy J L Bell, Bond University
  • Andrew Hayen, University of New South Wales
  • Paul P. Glasziou
  • Andrew S Mitchell, Department of Health, Australian Government, Canberra, Australia
  • Maria Farris, Novartis Pharmaceuticals, Sydney, Australia
  • Jonathan Wright, Numerus Limited, Wokingham, United Kingdom
  • Hans-Peter Duerr, Numerus Limited, Tübingen, Germany
  • Paul Mitchell, University of Sydney, Australia
  • Les Irwig, University of Sydney, Australia
Date of this Version
1-1-2017
Document Type
Journal Article
Grant Number
NHMRC Early Career Fellowship No. 1013390, Australia Fellowship No. 527500, and Program Grant No. 633003
Publication Details

Published version

Bell, K.J., Hayen, A., Glasziou, P., Mitchell, A.S., Farris, M., Wright, J., Duerr, H.P., Mitchell, P., Irwig, L. (2017). Early CRT monitoring using time-domain optical coherence tomography does not add to visual acuity for predicting visual loss in patients with central retinal vein occlusion treated with Intravitreal Ranibizumab: A secondary analysis of trial data. Retina, 37(3), 509-514.

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Copyright © 2016 by the American Osteopathic Association

Distribution License
Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0
Disciplines
Abstract

PURPOSE:

Our primary purpose was to assess the clinical (predictive) validity of central retinal thickness (CRT) and best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) at 1 week and 1 month after starting treatment with ranibizumab for central retinal vein occlusion. The authors also assessed detectability of response to treatment.

METHODS:

he authors used data from 325 participants in the CRUISE study, which included measurement of time-domain CRT and BCVA at baseline, 1 week, 1 month, and 6 months postrandomization. Analysis of covariance models were fitted to assess clinical validity, and distributions of change were constructed to assess detectability of response.

RESULTS:

There was no evidence that 1-week CRT, and very strong evidence that 1-week BCVA were associated with baseline-adjusted BCVA at 6 months (P = 0.17 and P < 0.001, respectively). There was strong evidence that both 1-month CRT and 1-month BCVA were associated with baseline-adjusted 6-month BCVA (P = 0.005 and P < 0.001, respectively), but simultaneous adjustment found evidence of independent association only for BCVA (P = 0.71 and P < 0.001 for CRT and BCVA, respectively). Detectability of response tended to be higher for CRT than BCVA at 1 week and 1 month but by 6 months these were equivalent for CRT and BCVA.

CONCLUSION:

In this study, BCVA monitoring of treated central retinal vein occlusion patients seemed more informative than time-domain optical coherence tomography monitoring.This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives License 4.0 (CC BY-NC-ND), which permits downloading and sharing the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially.

Citation Information
Katy J L Bell, Andrew Hayen, Paul P. Glasziou, Andrew S Mitchell, et al.. "Early CRT monitoring using time-domain optical coherence tomography does not add to visual acuity for predicting visual loss in patients with central retinal vein occlusion treated with Intravitreal Ranibizumab: A secondary analysis of trial data" Retina: The Journal of Retinal and Vitreous Diseases Vol. 37 Iss. 3 (2017) p. 509 - 514 ISSN: 1539-2864
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/paul_glasziou/197/