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Article
Seventy-five trials and eleven systematic reviews a day: How will we ever keep up?
PLoS Medicine
  • Hilda Bastian, German Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care
  • Paul Glasziou, Bond University
  • Iain Chalmers, James Lind Library
Date of this Version
9-1-2010
Document Type
Journal Article
Publication Details

Published Version.

Bastian, H., Glasziou, P. & Chalmers, I. (2010). Seventy-five trials and eleven systematic reviews a day: How will we ever keep up? PLoS Medicine, 7(9), e1000326.

Access the publisher's website.

2010 HERDC submission. FoR Code: 111717, 110399

2010 Bastian et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Thirty years ago, and a quarter of a century after randomised trials had become widely accepted, Archie Cochrane reproached the medical profession for not having managed to organise a ‘‘critical summary, by speciality or subspeciality, adapted periodically, of all relevant randomised controlled trials’’. Thirty years after Cochrane’s reproach we feel it is timely to consider the extent to which health professionals, the public and policymakers could now use ‘‘critical summaries’’ of trials for their decision-making.

Citation Information
Hilda Bastian, Paul Glasziou and Iain Chalmers. "Seventy-five trials and eleven systematic reviews a day: How will we ever keep up?" PLoS Medicine Vol. 7 Iss. 9 (2010) p. 1 - 6
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/paul_glasziou/16/