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Article
Landscape evolution, valley excavation, and terrace development following abrupt postglacial base-level fall
Geological Society of America Bulletin (2013)
  • Patrick Belmont, Utah State University
Abstract
Many high-latitude fluvial systems are adjusting to base-level changes since the last glaciation. Channels that experienced base-level fall may still be incising, often through glacial diamictons (tills). These tills can be quite competent, behaving more like weak bedrock than unconsolidated sediment, and erode at a fast pace, thus providing a unique opportunity to test models of channel incision and knickpoint migration in transient systems. Here, we integrate light detection and ranging (LiDAR) topography, strath terrace chronology, and numerical modeling to determine knickpoint migration and incision history of the Le Sueur River in central Minnesota, USA...
Disciplines
Publication Date
2013
Publisher Statement
doi: 10.1130/B30772.1
Citation Information
Patrick Belmont. "Landscape evolution, valley excavation, and terrace development following abrupt postglacial base-level fall" Geological Society of America Bulletin Vol. 125 Iss. 11-12 (2013)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/patrick_belmont/67/