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Article
Robots in the classroom: Differences in students’ perceptions of credibility and learning between “teacher as robot” and “robot as teacher”
Computers in Human Behavior (2016)
  • Autumn Edwards, Western Michigan University
  • Chad Edwards, Western Michigan University
  • Patric R Spence, University of Kentukcy
  • Christina Harris, University of Kentucky
  • Andrew Gambino, Pennsylvania State University - Main Campus
Abstract
Advancements in technology are bringing robotics into interpersonal communication contexts, including
the college classroom. This study was one of the first to examine college students’ communication related
perceptions of robots being used in an instructional capacity. Student participants rated both a human instructor using a telepresence robot and an autonomous social robot delivering the same lesson as credible. However, students gave higher credibility ratings to the teacher as robot, which led to differences between the two instructional agents in their learning outcomes. Students reported more affective learning from the teacher as robot than the robot as teacher, despite controlled instructional performances. Instructional agent type had both direct and indirect effects on behavioral learning. The direct effect suggests a potential machine heuristic in which students are more likely to follow behavioral suggestions offered by an autonomous social robot. The findings generally support the MAIN model and the Computers are Social Actors paradigm, but suggest that future work needs to be done in this area.
Keywords
  • robot,
  • credibility,
  • CASA,
  • Human-machine communication,
  • telepresence,
  • learning,
  • Teaching,
  • MAIN Model
Disciplines
Publication Date
2016
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2016.06.005
Citation Information
Autumn Edwards, Chad Edwards, Patric R Spence, Christina Harris, et al.. "Robots in the classroom: Differences in students’ perceptions of credibility and learning between “teacher as robot” and “robot as teacher”" Computers in Human Behavior Vol. 65 (2016) p. 627 - 634
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/patric_spence/64/