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About Pamela Petrease Felder, Ph.D.

Dr. Felder’s research focuses on the racial and cultural experiences associated with doctoral degree attainment. Particularly, she is committed to enhancing models of doctoral student socialization She believes that an understanding of the doctorate, has tremendous implications for learning and/or addressing many areas of higher education that have been viewed historically as problematic. The foremost concern in her research is the discussion of inequity in access in postsecondary education. Thus, her work not only examines the statistical trends of the doctoral degree attainment it also explores pre-doctoral and post-doctoral degree experiences to shed light on the socialization aspects of students who enter doctoral study and the disciplinary identities of doctoral degree holders as they begin to engage in their professions.
In August 2010 Dr. Pamela Felder joined the faculty of the Higher Education Program in the Graduate School of Education at the University of Pennsylvania. Her professional background includes a three-year teaching appointment in the Higher and Postsecondary Education Program at Teachers College, Columbia University in New York. Additionally, she served as Lecturer in the Community College Leadership Doctoral Program at Morgan State University in Maryland. She has developed and taught courses in mixed methods research, diversity in higher education, college student retention, professional development in higher education and college student development. Dr. Felder’s primary research interests are graduate student development and doctoral degree completion with an emphasis on the impact racial/cultural experiences on persistence. This work includes a focus on academic socialization and the process of disciplinary identity development.
Dr. Felder’s research explores the relationship between the belief systems and behaviors of doctoral students and their impact on academic socialization, success, and degree completion. Her work is comprised of an examination of the historical societal factors that have shaped barriers to degree completion and students’ approach to negotiating these barriers. Prior socialization experiences serve to shed light on the socialization aspects of students who enter doctoral study and the disciplinary identities of doctoral degree holders as they begin to engage in their professions.

Positions

Present Lecturer, University of Pennsylvania
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Disciplines



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Honors and Awards

  • Profiles in Diversity - Named among 60 "Trailblazers" in the field of diversity

Courses

  • Diversity in Higher Education
  • The Community College