Skip to main content
Unpublished Paper
iSpy: International Silent Conflicts, Cyber Warfare and Developments in International Diplomatic Law
(2012)
  • P. Sean MORRIS, University of Helsinki
Abstract

This article is about two interconnected issues: espionage in the era of the World Wide Web and diplomatic premises under international law. The discussion arises as a result of diplomatic immunity that was granted to Julian Assange by the Ecuadorean government after he entered the London embassy in June 2012 for fear of being extradited to the U.S to allegedly face prosecution for treason. The discussion in this article gages on electronic cyber warfare as international silent conflicts and that the gathering of data in cyber space is a form of espionage, wittingly or unwittlgly. The article then examines the role of diplomatic premises and diplomatic asylum when someone has accessed classified government data if that person is not known to be working for state’s security bureau. The discussion is relevant in that diplomats enjoy international immunities and the role of diplomatic asylum in international law is not readily recognized in international law.

Keywords
  • International Silent Conflicts; Diplomatic Asylum,
  • Diplomatic Law,
  • Cyber warfare,
  • Espionage
Disciplines
Publication Date
Summer August 27, 2012
Citation Information
P. Sean MORRIS. "iSpy: International Silent Conflicts, Cyber Warfare and Developments in International Diplomatic Law" (2012)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/p_sean_morris/33/