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Induction of callus on Capsicum annuum: The first step toward micropropagation.
The Journal of the Utah Academy of Sciences, Arts, & Letters (2014)
  • Samantha Beck, Utah Valley University
  • Toma Todorov, Utah Valley University
  • Olga Kopp, Utah Valley University
Abstract
Micropropagation is important for breeding programs of economically important plants. This research focuses on the establishment of embryogenic callus in Capsicum annuum, an economically important plant species. The induction of such callus is the first step toward micropropagation of this species. C. annuum produces capsaicin, a chemical that has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treating pain. Culture suspension can increase production of secondary metabolites, in this case capsaicin. In this study two varieties of C. annuum (Thai and Jalapeno) were evaluated for their response to different concentrations of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), 6- benzylaminopurine (BAP), 2,4–dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), and silver nitrate (AgNO3). These hormones induced callus growth that was qualitatively measured based on the percent coverage of the explant. IAA and AgNO3 showed no effect on callus growth. The best callus growth was observed in response to 5 µM BAP and 2.5 µM 2,4-D. 32 Biology Fruit extracts were also evaluated to determine the effect on the growth of callus when combined with hormones. The Thai extract had no statistically relevant (P=0.1277) effect while the addition of 5% Jalapeno extract did show a significant increase in callus (P=0.0159).
Keywords
  • Capsicum annuum,
  • micropropagation,
  • callus growth
Disciplines
Publication Date
2014
Citation Information
Samantha Beck, Toma Todorov and Olga Kopp. "Induction of callus on Capsicum annuum: The first step toward micropropagation." The Journal of the Utah Academy of Sciences, Arts, & Letters Vol. 91 (2014) ISSN: 13:978-0-981-5501-8-3
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/olga-kopp/3/