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Article
Layperson CPR--are we training the right people
Women’s Health Research Faculty Publications
  • Robert J. Goldberg, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Joel M. Gore, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Donald G. Love
  • Judith K. Ockene, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • James E. Dalen
UMMS Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine; Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine
Date
9-1-1984
Document Type
Article
Subjects
Adult; Age Factors; *Coronary Disease; Data Collection; Educational Status; *Family; Female; Humans; Male; Massachusetts; Middle Aged; Resuscitation
Abstract
A case-control study was undertaken to examine differences in the extent of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training among family members of patients with and without coronary heart disease. There were no significant differences in the proportion of family members of patients with coronary disease (22.0%) who had ever taken a CPR course compared to family members of patients seen in a primary care clinic (25.6%) or in randomly selected neighborhood controls (28.7%). Family members of patients with coronary disease, however, had not only taken fewer CPR courses but had taken these courses considerably further in the past than had respective comparison groups. Moreover only 9% of these family members had taken CPR due to their family member's coronary disease.
Rights and Permissions
Citation: Ann Emerg Med. 1984 Sep;13(9 Pt 1):701-4.
Related Resources
Link to article in PubMed
PubMed ID
6465651
Citation Information
Robert J. Goldberg, Joel M. Gore, Donald G. Love, Judith K. Ockene, et al.. "Layperson CPR--are we training the right people" Vol. 13 Iss. 9 Pt 1 (1984) ISSN: 0196-0644 (Print)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/ockenej/161/