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Article
Provision of pandemic disease information by health sciences librarians: a multisite comparative case series.
Journal of the Medical Library Association
  • Robin Featherstone
  • Gabriel Boldt
  • Nazi Torabi, UWO
  • Shauna-Lee Konrad
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
4-1-2012
URL with Digital Object Identifier
10.3163/1536-5050.100.2.008
Abstract
Objective: The research provides an understanding of pandemic information needs and informs professional development initiatives for librarians in disaster medicine. Methods: Utilizing a multisite, comparative case series design, the researchers conducted semi-structured interviews and examined supplementary materials in the form of organizational documents, correspondence, and websites to create a complete picture of each case. The rigor of the case series was ensured through data and investigator triangulation. Interview transcripts were coded using NVivo to identify common themes and points of comparison. Results: Comparison of the four cases revealed a distinct difference between “client-initiated” and “librarian-initiated” provision of pandemic information. Librarian-initiated projects utilized social software to “push” information, whereas client-initiated projects operated within patron-determined parameters to deliver information. Health care administrators were identified as a key audience for pandemic information, and news agencies were utilized as essential information sources. Librarians' skills at evaluating available information proved crucial for selecting best-quality evidence to support administrative decision making. Conclusions: Qualitative analysis resulted in increased understanding of pandemic information needs and identified best practices for disseminating information during periods of high organizational stress caused by an influx of new cases of an unknown infectious disease.
Citation Information
Robin Featherstone, Gabriel Boldt, Nazi Torabi and Shauna-Lee Konrad. "Provision of pandemic disease information by health sciences librarians: a multisite comparative case series." Journal of the Medical Library Association Vol. 100 Iss. 2 (2012) p. 104 - 112
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/ntorabi/1/