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Article
Seeds, weeds and greed: an analysis of the Gene Technology Act 2000 (Cth), its effect on property rights, and the legal and policy dimensions of a constitutional challenge
Macquarie Law Journal
  • Nicole Rogers, Southern Cross University
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
1-1-2002
Peer Reviewed
Peer-Reviewed
Abstract

Australia's Gene Technology Act 2000 (Cth) (GTA) legislation facilitates the widespread commercial release and use of genetically engineered (GE) seeds but does not address the economic ramification of the commercial production of GE crops on neighbouring and nearby farmers. The GTA recognizes and permits the use of property rights of GE seed manufacturers, but does not compensate third party farmers for the economic losses they suffer, which result from genetic pollution or any loss of plant germplasm.

Disciplines
Citation Information

Rogers, N 2002, 'Seeds, weeds and greed: an analysis of the Gene Technology Act 2000 (Cth), its effect on property rights, and the legal and policy dimensions of a constitutional challenge', Macquarie Law Journal, vol. 2, pp. 1-30.