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Presentation
Relationship between Position, Cumulative Impacts and Cumulative Accelerations in NCAA Division I Football Players
South East Regional Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, (2016)
  • K. Grimes, Georgia Southern University
  • E. D. Shiflett, Georgia Southern University
  • B. A. Munkasy, Georgia Southern University
  • K. M. Ake, Georgia Southern University
  • Nathan D’Amico, Georgia Southern University
  • Megan E. Mormile, Georgia Southern University
  • D. Powell, Campbell University
  • T. A. Buckley, University of Delaware
  • Nicholas G Murray, Georgia Southern University
Abstract
PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential differences between cumulative number of linear acceleration (LA) magnitudes over course of a single contact sport season by position (line versus skill) and participation setting (games versus practice). METHODS: Thirty Two NCAA Division I football players were fitted with Head Impact Telemetry (HIT) System sensors that measured acceleration forces associated with a head impact (player vs player or contact with ground). Linear accelerations were recorded for all impacts above 10 g during the 2014-2015 competitive football season and compared with paired sample ttests. RESULTS: Over the course of one season, players accumulated significantly higher cumulative LA (p=0.001) in practices (9,854 ± 8,654g) versus games (4,991 ± 5,064g). Line players (offensive linemen, defensive linemen, tight ends, and defensive ends) had a significantly higher (p=0.001) cumulative LA (17,858 ± 8,865g) in practices when compared to skill positions (running backs, wide receivers, linebackers, defensive backs, and quarterbacks; 4,673 ± 2,755g). However, line players cumulative LA (6,870 ± 6,3632g) were not significantly different (p=0.153) during games when compared to skill positions (3,856 ± 3,877g). Mean LA magnitude of impacts of line players demonstrated no significant differences during practices (27.7 ± 7.5g) and games (29.3 ± 6.4g) when compared to skill players during practices (25.65 ± 9.84g) and games (29.1 ± 9.3g). CONCLUSION: Over the course of a single football season, line players experienced significantly higher cumulative LA when compared to skill positions in both practices and games. This could be due to more contact hours for line players during practice.
Keywords
  • NCAA Division I,
  • Football players,
  • Cumulative accelerations,
  • Cumulative impacts,
  • Position
Publication Date
February, 2016
Location
Greenville, SC
Citation Information
K. Grimes, E. D. Shiflett, B. A. Munkasy, K. M. Ake, et al.. "Relationship between Position, Cumulative Impacts and Cumulative Accelerations in NCAA Division I Football Players" South East Regional Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine, (2016)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/nicholas-murray/40/