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Article
A digital revolution: comparison of demographic profiles, attitudes and gambling behavior of internet and non-internet gamblers
Computers in Human Behavior
  • Sally M Gainsbury, Southern Cross University
  • Robert Wood, University of Lethbridge
  • Alex Russell, University of Sydney
  • Nerilee Hing, Southern Cross University
  • Alex Blaszczynski, University of Sydney
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
1-1-2012
Peer Reviewed
Peer-Reviewed
Abstract
Internet gambling is one of the fastest growing sectors of e-commerce and rapidly growing as a mode of gambling. Although Internet gambling is characterized by high levels of customer choice, little is known about Internet gamblers or their engagement with Internet and non-Internet forms of gambling. Regulators are struggling to respond to Internet gambling given that little is known about the impact of this mode of gambling on the existing gambling market, who is gambling online and how. This paper presents one of the largest studies of Internet gambling; an online survey completed by 6682 Australian gamblers. Results show that Internet gamblers are a heterogeneous group, although there is a tendency for Internet gamblers to be male, have high incomes and be well educated. Internet gamblers have more positive attitudes towards gambling and are more highly involved gamblers, engaging in many different gambling activities in both online and offline forms. However, a proportion of Internet gamblers prefer the privacy and anonymity of Internet gambling and do not like land-based venues, suggesting that Internet gambling is creating a new market of gambling customers. Understanding the impact of this new mode of gamblers on existing gamblers and new players is important to contribute to the appropriate regulation of this activity.
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Citation Information

Gainsbury, SM, Wood, R, Russell, A, Hing, N & Blaszczynski, A 2012, 'A digital revolution: comparison of demographic profiles, attitudes and gambling behavior of internet and non-nternet gamblers', Computers in Human Behavior, vol. 28, no. 4, pp. 1388-1398.