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Article
Predicting Risk Factors for Intimate Partner Violence Among Post-9/11 College Student Veterans
Journal of Interpersonal Violence (2016)
  • Elena L. Klaw, San Jose State University
  • Anne L. Demers, San Jose State University
  • Nancy Da Silva, San Jose State University
Abstract
The current conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq present unique risk factors for military personnel that increase the likelihood of psychological distress and concomitant consequences related to trauma. Several studies have found that the stress brought about by financial difficulties, unemployment, and the need to renegotiate roles and responsibilities with spouses following discharge increases the likelihood of relationship strain and even intimate partner violence in the veteran population. This study was undertaken to determine the challenges related to maintaining healthy relationships for college student veterans who have served in the armed forces since September 11, 2001. Psychological distress, substance use, and hypermasculine attitudes were explored as risk factors for intimate violence. Social support was found to be a protective buffer against psychological aggression. However, approximately a third of college student veterans reported low social support along with symptoms of distress, placing them at elevated risk of partner abuse. The current article explores models for predicting risk of perpetrating aggression in college student veterans and concludes that culturally tailored programs and services are needed.
Keywords
  • Veterans,
  • college students,
  • relationships,
  • domestic violence,
  • intimate partner violence
Disciplines
Publication Date
February, 2016
DOI
10.1177/0886260514556102
Publisher Statement
SJSU users: use the following link to login and access the article via SJSU databases.
Citation Information
Elena L. Klaw, Anne L. Demers and Nancy Da Silva. "Predicting Risk Factors for Intimate Partner Violence Among Post-9/11 College Student Veterans" Journal of Interpersonal Violence Vol. 31 Iss. 4 (2016) p. 572 - 597 ISSN: 0886-2605
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/nancy_dasilva/14/