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Thesis
Rapid Access to Perinatal Psychiatric Care in Depression (RAPPID): A Master’s Thesis
GSBS Dissertations and Theses
  • Nancy Byatt, University of Massachusetts Medical School
Approval Date
4-14-2015
Document Type
Master's Thesis
Department
Medicine
First Thesis Advisor
Lori Pbert, PhD
Keywords
  • Perinatal Care,
  • Depression,
  • Depressive Disorder,
  • Mental Health Services,
  • Postpartum Period
Subjects
Theses, UMMS; Perinatal Care; Depression; Depressive Disorder; Mental Health Services; Postpartum Period
Abstract
Depression is the leading cause of disability among women of reproductive age worldwide. Upwards of 1 in 5 women suffer from perinatal depression. This condition has deleterious effects on several birth outcomes, infant attachment, and children’s behavior/development. Maternal suicide causes 20% of postpartum deaths in depressed women. Although the vast majority of perinatal women are amenable to being screened for depression, screening alone does not improve treatment rates or patient outcomes. Obstetrics/Gynecology (Ob/Gyn) clinics need supports in place to adequately address depression in their patient populations. The primary goal of this thesis is to develop, refine, and pilot test a new low-cost and sustainable stepped care program for Ob/Gyn clinics that will improve perinatal women’s depression treatment rates and outcomes. We developed and beta tested the Rapid Access to Perinatal Psychiatric Care in Depression (RAPPID) Program, to create a comprehensive intervention that is proactive, multifaceted, and practical. RAPPID aims to improve perinatal depression treatment and treatment response rates through: (1) access to immediate resource provision/referrals and psychiatric telephone consultation for Ob/Gyn providers; (2) clinic-specific implementation of depression care, including training support and toolkits; and (3) proactive depression screening, assessment, and treatment in OB/Gyn clinics. RAPPID builds on a low-cost and widely disseminated population-based model for delivering psychiatric care in primary care settings. Formative data and feedback from key stakeholders also informed the development of RAPPID. Our formative and pilot work in real-world settings suggests RAPPID is feasible and has the potential to improve depression detection and treatment in Ob/Gyn settings. The next step will be to compare two active interventions, RAPPID vs. enhanced usual care (access to resource provision/referrals and psychiatric telephone consultation) in a cluster-randomized trial in which we will randomize 12 Ob/Gyn clinics to either RAPPID or enhanced usual care.
DOI
10.13028/M2XG6M
Rights and Permissions
Copyright is held by the author, with all rights reserved.
Citation Information
Nancy Byatt. "Rapid Access to Perinatal Psychiatric Care in Depression (RAPPID): A Master’s Thesis" (2015)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/nancy_byatt/31/