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How did Belle La Follette Resist Racial Segregation in Washington D.C., 1913-1914?
History
  • Nancy Unger, Santa Clara University
Document Type
Other
Publication Date
6-1-2004
Publisher
Alexander Street Press
Abstract
Beginning in 1913, progressive reformer Belle Case La Follette wrote a series of articles for the "women's page" of her family's magazine, denouncing the sudden racial segregation in several departments of the federal government. Those articles reveal progressive efforts to appeal specifically to women to combat injustice, and also demonstrate the ability of women to voice important political opinions prior to suffrage.
Part of
Women and Social Movements in the United States, 1775-2000
Editor
Kathryn Sklar
Thomas Dublin
Comments

Copyright © 2004 Thomas Dublin, Kathryn Kish Sklar and Alexander Street Press, LLC. Reprinted with permission. Any future reproduction requires permission from original copyright holders.

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Citation Information
Unger, N. (2004) How did Belle La Follette Resist Racial Segregation in Washington D.C., 1913-1914? In K. Sklar and T. Dublin (Eds.) Women and Social Movements in the United States, 1775-2000, 8, no. 2. New York: Alexander Street Press.