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Article
Understanding Coordination in Computer-Mediated versus Face-to-Face Groups
Computers in Human Behavior
  • Nancy J. Stone, Missouri University of Science and Technology
  • Matthew Posey
Abstract
Groups performed intellective and judgmental tasks in face-to-face (FTF) or computer-mediated communication (CMC) settings after coordination training or no training to determine the impact of CMC, training, and task type on group performance and coordination. Help seeking behaviors were stronger predictors of perceived and actual performance in CMC than FTF groups, but varied based on task type. in turn, training generally increased seeking behaviors, except non-task seeking behaviors in CMC groups; and seeking behaviors were stronger predictors for perceived performance in CMC than FTF groups. in addition, perceived performance was lower in CMC than FTF groups when untrained, but not when trained. Yet, performance agreement was similar on both tasks in FTF groups, but lower on the intellective than the judgmental task in CMC groups.
Department(s)
Psychological Science
Keywords and Phrases
  • Computer-Mediated,
  • Coordination,
  • Distributed Teams,
  • Groups,
  • Teamwork
Document Type
Article - Journal
Document Version
Citation
File Type
text
Language(s)
English
Rights
© 2008 Elsevier, All rights reserved.
Publication Date
5-1-2008
Disciplines
Citation Information
Nancy J. Stone and Matthew Posey. "Understanding Coordination in Computer-Mediated versus Face-to-Face Groups" Computers in Human Behavior Vol. 24 Iss. 3 (2008) p. 827 - 851 ISSN: 7475632
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/nancy-stone/14/