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Article
Care reasoning in interpersonal relationships: cognition about moral obligation and personal choice
North American Journal of Psychology (2012)
  • Nadia Sorkhabi, San Jose State University
Abstract
Reasoning of European American late adolescents (N = 120) about moral responsibility in interpersonal relationships (parent-child and friend) was examined by interviewing them about situations of care where one person (recipient) directly asks another for help (agent). Results revealed that moral judgments involve concern for both recipient's welfare that is in need and agent's welfare who may suffer loss to provide help. Moral judgments are contingent on coordination of cost to agent and benefit to recipient, the mutual and non-mutual context of relationships, and whether a parent or a friend is seeking help. Contrary to the justice-entered paradigm ascribed to individualist cultures, this study found that European Americans do reason that providing care and promoting the welfare of parents and friends is a moral responsibility.
Keywords
  • Cognition,
  • Interpersonal relations,
  • psychology,
  • Science,
  • care judgments
Disciplines
Publication Date
2012
Publisher Statement
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Citation Information
Nadia Sorkhabi. "Care reasoning in interpersonal relationships: cognition about moral obligation and personal choice" North American Journal of Psychology Vol. 14 Iss. 2 (2012)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/nadia_sorkhabi/3/