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Presentation
Using Youth Administered Research to Address Alcohol and Tobacco use Prevention in Adolescents: Applications, Results and Lessons Learned
128th Annual Meeting of the American Public Health Association (2000)
  • Carol A. Bryant, University of South Florida
  • Kelli R. McCormack-Brown, University of South Florida
  • Danielle C. Landis, University of South Florida
  • Moya L. Alfonso, Georgia Southern University
  • Karen Abrenica, University of South Florida
  • Robert J. McDermott, University of South Florida
  • Melinda S. Forthofer, University of South Florida
  • Sherri Reynolds, University of South Florida
Abstract
Background: The Florida Prevention Research Center (FPRC) at the University of South Florida uses "Community Based Prevention Marketing" (CBPM) to develop innovative prevention programs within communities. The FPRC's first demonstration of CBPM is a joint effort with the Sarasota County, Florida community to reduce smoking and alcohol use among adolescents. Approach: With CBPM, community members are trained and assist in all phases of the process, from planning to evaluation. Communities use a "marketing mindset" in developing programs that are consumer oriented, thus increasing the likelihood of long-term sustainability. Methods: a defining element of this model is the use of qualitative, formative research, which is used to develop the intervention. In this Sarasota project, local high school students were recruited and trained to conduct the formative research. This research included 22 focus groups and 131 in- depth, personal interviews for a total of 225 subjects. Youth researchers also assisted in the development of the research guides and questionnaires and analysis and interpretation of the data. Results: the research yielded results that both supported and extended existing findings in this area. Most interesting were the findings regarding: youth opinions of existing interventions; intervention strategies that youth thought would be effective; behavioral determinants; and the role that parents play in modeling drinking and smoking behaviors. Implications: these findings have implications for developing highly targeted tobacco and alcohol prevention interventions with adolescents. Evaluation of the research conducted also has implications for the need to use youth as researchers when developing programs for youth. Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, the participant in this session will be able to: 1. Discuss a new method for approaching tobacco and alcohol related prevention research and program development in adolescent populations; 2. Evaluate the effectiveness of utilizing this method with their communities and research; 3. Recognize the effectiveness of utilizing youth as researchers when approaching data collection and analysis in youth populations; 4. Discuss research findings that may have implications for clarifying or extending their current research in tobacco and alcohol use in adolescents.
Keywords
  • Adolescent health,
  • Community research
Publication Date
2000
Citation Information
Carol A. Bryant, Kelli R. McCormack-Brown, Danielle C. Landis, Moya L. Alfonso, et al.. "Using Youth Administered Research to Address Alcohol and Tobacco use Prevention in Adolescents: Applications, Results and Lessons Learned" 128th Annual Meeting of the American Public Health Association (2000)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/moya_alfonso/109/