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Article
Religion and earnings: evidence from Germany
Journal of Social Economics
  • Elisabeth Sinnewe, Queensland University of Technology
  • Michael Kortt, Southern Cross University
  • Tod Steen
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
1-1-2016
Peer Reviewed
Peer-Reviewed
Abstract
Purpose The purpose of this paper is to estimate the association between religious affiliation and the rate of return to human capital for German men and women. Design/methodology/approach This paper employs data from the 1997, 2003, 2007 and 2011 waves of the German Socio-Economic Panel for German men and women in full-time employment between the age of 25 and 54. The association between religious affiliation and wages was estimated using a conventional human capital model. Findings This paper finds that Catholic men (women) received a wage premium of 4 per cent (3 per cent) relative to their Protestant counterparts, even after controlling for an extensive range of demographic, economic and social characteristics. Originality/value The study contributes to the literature by providing – to the best of the authors’ knowledge – the first results on the wage premium received by Catholic men and women in the German labour market.
Disciplines
Citation Information

Sinnewe, E, Kortt, M & Steen, T 2016, 'Religion and earnings: evidence from Germany', Journal of Social Economics, vol. 43, no. 8, pp. 841-855.

Published version available from:

http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/IJSE-08-2014-0172