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Mental health clinicians' beliefs about medicines, attitudes, and expectations of improved medication adherence in patients
Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)
  • Mitchell K Byrne, University of Wollongong
  • Peter Caputi, University of Wollongong
  • Frank P Deane, University of Wollongong
RIS ID
24542
Publication Date
1-1-2008
Publication Details

Byrne, M. K., Deane, F. P. & Caputi, P. (2008). Mental health clinicians'' beliefs about medicines, attitudes, and expectations of improved medication adherence in patients. Evaluation and the Health Professions, 31 (4), 390-403.

Abstract
Nonadherence to antipsychotic medications remains a major factor in poor clinical outcomes. This study sought to identify clinician beliefs about patients who do not adhere to treatment, the clinicians' own beliefs about medicines, and the impact of beliefs on efforts to enhance patient adherence. In total, 292 clinicians responded to an anonymous questionnaire that included questions about their beliefs and their efforts to enhance adherence. Results indicated that clinicians' beliefs about their own adequacy to enhance adherence significantly predicted actual efforts to enhance adherence. Both pessimism about outcomes and empathy for the patient predicted outcome expectancy. It was concluded that enhancing clinicians' beliefs about working with nonadherent patients is a potentially important ingredient in efforts to improve patient adherence.
Citation Information
Mitchell K Byrne, Peter Caputi and Frank P Deane. "Mental health clinicians' beliefs about medicines, attitudes, and expectations of improved medication adherence in patients" (2008) p. 390 - 403
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/mitchell_byrne/8/