Skip to main content
Article
The Paradox of Protestantism and Women in Elected Office in the United States
Women, Politics, and Policy (2007)
  • Mirya R Holman, Duke University
Abstract

In cross-national studies, scholars have found that wealthy countries and those with a Protestant tradition are more likely to have higher levels of women in elected office. Even though the United States should then be high in this domain, it lags behind many similarly situated countries. We posit that one reason for this paradox is that Protestantism in the United States is far more socially conservative than is typical in other Protestant countries. To test our argument, we use state-level data on the proportion of women in elected office from 2002 to 2004 and survey data on church membership. We find a negative relationship between the percentage of Protestants belonging to churches associated with the National Association of Evangelicals, a lobbying group representing socially conservative Protestant denominations, and the proportion of women in elected office.

Keywords
  • women,
  • politics,
  • religion,
  • voting,
  • representation,
  • Elected office,
  • Protestant,
  • conservative
Publication Date
2007
Citation Information
Mirya R Holman. "The Paradox of Protestantism and Women in Elected Office in the United States" Women, Politics, and Policy Vol. 29 Iss. 1 (2007)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/mirya_holman/3/