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Substituting the Senses
The Oxford Handbook of the Philosophy of Perception (2013)
  • Mirko Farina
  • Julian Kiverstein
  • Andy Clark, University of Edinburgh
Abstract

Sensory substitution devices are a type of sensory prosthesis that (typically) convert visual stimuli transduced by a camera into tactile or auditory stimulation. They are designed to be used by people with impaired vision so that they can recover some of the functions normally subserved by vision. In this chapter we will consider what philosophers might learn about the nature of the senses from the neuroscience of sensory substitution. We will show how sensory substitution devices work by exploiting the cross-modal plasticity of sensory cortex: the ability of sensory cortex to pick up some types of information about the external environment irrespective of the nature of the sensory inputs it is processing. We explore the implications of cross-modal plasticity for theories of the senses that attempt to make distinctions between the senses on the basis of neurobiology.

Publication Date
2013
Citation Information
Mirko Farina, Julian Kiverstein and Andy Clark. "Substituting the Senses" The Oxford Handbook of the Philosophy of Perception (2013)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/mirko_farina/11/