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Article
Compliance with National Cholesterol Education Program dietary and lifestyle guidelines among older women with self-reported hypercholesterolemia. The Women's Health Initiative
Preventive and Behavioral Medicine Publications and Presentations
  • Judith Hsia, George Washington University
  • Rebecca Rodabough
  • Milagros C. Rosal, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Barbara B. Cochrane
  • Barbara V. Howard
  • Linda G. Snetselaar
  • William H. Frishman
  • Marcia L. Stefanick, Stanford University
UMMS Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine
Date
10-29-2002
Document Type
Article
Subjects
Age Factors; Aged; Cross-Sectional Studies; Female; Humans; Hypercholesterolemia; *Life Style; Middle Aged; Patient Compliance; Patient Education as Topic; Practice Guidelines as Topic; Sex Factors; Socioeconomic Factors; United States
Abstract
PURPOSE: Dietary therapy remains the first line of treatment for patients with high blood cholesterol levels. Among free-living persons, compliance with National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) dietary recommendations is uncertain. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional, baseline analysis of 91,627 postmenopausal women enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study. Among women with self-reported hypercholesterolemia, we ascertained factors associated with compliance with National Cholesterol Education Program dietary recommendations, defined for the Step II diet as RESULTS: Of the 13,777 participants who reported having high cholesterol levels requiring drug therapy, only 20% reported total fat, saturated fat, and dietary cholesterol consumption consistent with Step II dietary goals. Factors associated with Step II dietary compliance included having a college degree (odds ratio [OR] = 1.26; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.14 to 1.40), a prior cardiovascular event (OR = 1.48; 95% CI: 1.28 to 1.70), and consumption of five or more daily servings of fruits or vegetables (OR = 3.0; 95% CI: 2.7 to 3.3). Being married, smoking, a sedentary lifestyle, and a higher body mass index were all associated with reduced compliance (all P <0.0001). In the subsample in which plasma lipid levels were measured, dietary compliance was associated with higher levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P = 0.02). CONCLUSION: Since the inception of the NCEP in 1985, health care providers, public health programs, and patients have not successfully implemented the dietary recommendations.
Rights and Permissions
Citation: Am J Med. 2002 Oct 1;113(5):384-92.
Related Resources
Link to Article in PubMed
PubMed ID
12401533
Citation Information
Judith Hsia, Rebecca Rodabough, Milagros C. Rosal, Barbara B. Cochrane, et al.. "Compliance with National Cholesterol Education Program dietary and lifestyle guidelines among older women with self-reported hypercholesterolemia. The Women's Health Initiative" Vol. 113 Iss. 5 (2002) ISSN: 0002-9343 (Linking)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/milagros_rosal/33/