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Outcomes of a Latino community-based intervention for the prevention of diabetes: the Lawrence Latino Diabetes Prevention Project
Preventive and Behavioral Medicine Publications and Presentations
  • Ira S. Ockene, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Trinidad L. Teller, Greater Lawrence Family Health Center
  • Milagros C. Rosal, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • George W. Reed, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • John P. Mordes, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Philip A. Merriam, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Barbara C. Olendzki, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Garry Handelman, University of Massachusetts Lowell
  • Robert J. Nicolosi, University of Massachusetts Lowell
  • Yunsheng Ma, University of Massachusetts Medical School
UMMS Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Preventive and Behavorial Medicine; Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine; Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism
Date
2-1-2012
Document Type
Article
Subjects
Adult; Aged; Community Health Services; *Cultural Competency; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2; Diet; Exercise; Health Behavior; Health Promotion; Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated; *Hispanic Americans; Humans; Insulin Resistance; Life Style; Massachusetts; Middle Aged; *Outcome Assessment (Health Care); Poverty; Socioeconomic Factors; Weight Loss
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: We tested the effectiveness of a community-based, literacy-sensitive, and culturally tailored lifestyle intervention on weight loss and diabetes risk reduction among low-income, Spanish-speaking Latinos at increased diabetes risk. METHODS: Three hundred twelve participants from Lawrence, Massachusetts, were randomly assigned to lifestyle intervention care (IC) or usual care (UC) between 2004 and 2007. The intervention was implemented by trained Spanish-speaking individuals from the community. Each participant was followed for 1 year. RESULTS: The participants' mean age was 52 years; 59% had less than a high school education. The 1-year retention rate was 94%. Compared with the UC group, the IC group had a modest but significant weight reduction (-2.5 vs 0.63 lb; P = .04) and a clinically meaningful reduction in hemoglobin A1c (-0.10% vs -0.04%; P = .009). Likewise, insulin resistance improved significantly in the IC compared with the UC group. The IC group also had greater reductions in percentage of calories from total and saturated fat. CONCLUSIONS: We developed an inexpensive, culturally sensitive diabetes prevention program that resulted in weight loss, improved HbA1c, and improved insulin resistance in a high-risk Latino population.
Comments

Citation: Am J Public Health. 2012 Feb;102(2):336-42. Epub 2011 Dec 15. Link to article on publisher's site

Related Resources
Link to Article in PubMed
PubMed ID
22390448
Citation Information
Ira S. Ockene, Trinidad L. Teller, Milagros C. Rosal, George W. Reed, et al.. "Outcomes of a Latino community-based intervention for the prevention of diabetes: the Lawrence Latino Diabetes Prevention Project" Vol. 102 Iss. 2 (2012) ISSN: 0090-0036 (Linking)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/milagros_rosal/27/