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Article
A design education perspective on the process of interpreting words into pictures
Art, Design and Communication in Higher Education (2010)
  • Mike McAuley
Abstract

This paper discusses two learning strategies which were incrementally developed during three cycles of an action research project to facilitate student learning of the process of interpreting written text into an illustration. The two strategies relate to the cognitive processes of analysis and synthesis—from comprehension of textual meaning to visual concept generation. The first learning strategy which relates to analysis, involved assisting students develop macropropositions—personal understandings of the gist or essence of a text (Louwerse and Graesser, 2006; Armbruster, Anderson and Ostertag, 1987; Van Dijk & Kintsch, 1983). The second learning strategy which was concerned with idea generation, used a form of induction categorised as analogical reasoning (Holyoak, 2005; Sloman and Lagnado, 2005). Both strategies were combined to illustrate an expository text extract titled ‘Through The Magic Door’ The data suggests that design students benefit from a structured approach to learning, where thinking processes and approaches can be identified and accessible for other learning situations. The action research methodology is based on semi-structured interviews, questionnaires, developmental design (including student notes) and final design output.

Keywords
  • analogical reasoning,
  • action research,
  • text interpretation,
  • learning strategies
Publication Date
Winter January 1, 2010
Citation Information
Mike McAuley. "A design education perspective on the process of interpreting words into pictures" Art, Design and Communication in Higher Education Vol. 9 Iss. 2 (2010)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/mike_mcauley/2/