Skip to main content
Article
Muslim women's physician preference: Beyond obstetrics and gynecology
Health Care for Women International (2012)
  • Michelle McLean
  • Fatima Al Yahyaei
  • Muneera Al Mansoori
  • Mouza Al Ameri
  • Salma Al Ahbabi
  • Roos Bernsen
Abstract
When Emirati (Muslim) women (n = 218) were asked about their preferred physician (in terms of gender, religion, and nationality) for three personal clinical scenarios, a female was almost exclusively preferred for the gynecological (96.8%) and “stomach” (94.5%) scenarios, while ±46% of the women also preferred a female physician for the facial allergy scenario. Only 17% considered physician gender important for the prepubertal child scenario. Just over half of the women preferred a Muslim physician for personal examinations (vs. 37.6% for the child). Being less educated and having a lower literacy level were significant predictors of preferred physician religion for some personal scenarios, whereas a higher education level was a significant predictor for physician gender not mattering for the facial allergy scenario. Muslim women's preference for same gender physicians, and to a lesser extent religion, has implications for health care services beyond obstetrics and gynecology.
Disciplines
Publication Date
February 21, 2012
Publisher Statement

Citation only

McLean, M., Al Yahyaei, F., Al Mansoori, M., Al Ameri, M., Al Ahbabi S., & Bernsen, R. (2012). Muslim women's physician preference: Beyond obstetrics and gynecology. Health Care for Women International, 33(9), 849–876

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07399332.2011.645963

© Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, 2012

Citation Information
Michelle McLean, Fatima Al Yahyaei, Muneera Al Mansoori, Mouza Al Ameri, et al.. "Muslim women's physician preference: Beyond obstetrics and gynecology" Health Care for Women International Vol. 33 Iss. 9 (2012)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/michelle_mclean/12/