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Article
Preventing Unintended Pregnancies and Improving Contraceptive Use Among Young Adult Women in a Rural, Midwestern State: Health Promotion Implications
Women & Health (2010)
  • Michelle L. Campo, University of Iowa
  • Natoshia M. Askelson
Abstract
Despite high rates of unintended pregnancy among women aged 18 to 30 years, little research has been conducted to understand the factors associated with their contraceptive use. Eighteen focus groups were conducted with young adult women (N = 106) who were mostly white, non-Hispanic. Results suggested that contraceptive use was negatively affected by low contraceptive knowledge; use of alcohol; a lack of planning for sex; a misperception of the likelihood of pregnancy; forgetting to use contraceptives; and concerns about side effects, cost, and confidentiality. Women liked the peace of mind that using contraceptives gave them and the benefits of regular periods from some hormonal methods. Implications for reducing unintended pregnancies through interventions are offered.
Keywords
  • unintended pregnancy,
  • contraceptive use
Disciplines
Publication Date
2010
Publisher Statement
•Some individual journals may have policies prohibiting pre-print archiving •Pre-print on authors own website, Institutional or Subject Repository •Post-print on authors own website, Institutional or Subject Repository •Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used •On a non-profit server •Published source must be acknowledged •Must link to publisher version •Set statements to accompany deposits (see policy) •Publisher will deposit to PMC on behalf of NIH authors
Citation Information
Michelle L. Campo and Natoshia M. Askelson. "Preventing Unintended Pregnancies and Improving Contraceptive Use Among Young Adult Women in a Rural, Midwestern State: Health Promotion Implications" Women & Health Vol. 50 Iss. 3 (2010)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/michelle_campo/32/