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Contribution to Book
A Voice is Worth a Thousand Words: The Implications of the Micro-Coding of Social Signals in Speech for Trust Research
Articles and Chapters
  • Benjamin Waber, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Michele Williams, Cornell University
  • John Carroll, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Alex Pentland, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Publication Date
1-1-2012
Abstract

While self-report measures are often highly reliable for field research on trust (Mayer and Davis, 1999), subjects often cannot complete surveys during real time interactions. In contrast, the social signals that are embedded in the non-linguistic elements of conversations can be captured in real time and extracted with the assistance of computer coding. This chapter seeks to understand how computer-coded social signals are related to interpersonal trust.

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Suggested Citation
Waber, B., Williams, M., Carroll, J., & Pentland, A. (2012). A voice is worth a thousand words: The implications of the micro-coding of social signals in speech for trust research [Electronic version]. Retrieved [insert date], from Cornell University, ILR School site: http://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/articles/905/

Required Publisher’s Statement
© Edward Elgar Publishing. Final version published as: Waber, B., Williams, M., Carroll, J., & Pentland, A. (2012). A voice is worth a thousand words: The implications of the micro-coding of social signals in speech for trust research. In F. Lyon, G. Möllering, M. Saunders & T. Hatzakis (Eds.), Handbook of Research Methods on Trust(pp. 249-258). Northampton, MA: Edward Elgar Publishing. Reprinted with permission. All rights reserved.

Citation Information
Benjamin Waber, Michele Williams, John Carroll and Alex Pentland. "A Voice is Worth a Thousand Words: The Implications of the Micro-Coding of Social Signals in Speech for Trust Research" (2012)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/michele_williams/1/