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Unpublished Paper
Propelling Aviation to New Heights: Accessibility to In-Flight Entertainment for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Passengers
ExpressO (2012)
  • Michael A Schwartz, Syracuse University
Abstract
In-flight entertainment has been available for over forty-five years, but to this day remains without captions or subtitles, thus depriving deaf and hard of hearing passengers of access to this service. The Air Carrier Access Act of 1986 (“ACAA”) and implementing regulations do not require captioning of in-flight entertainment, and Congress, the airline industry and the U.S. Department of Transportation (“DOT”) have yet to remedy the problem. The courts do not allow deaf and hard of hearing passengers a private right of action and punitive damages under the ACAA. The DOT recently indicated it will issue a Notice of Proposed Rule Making on the subject, and what follows is an argument for a new regulation that interprets the ACAA to require captioning of in-flight entertainment on United States transcontinental and international flights.
Keywords
  • in-flight entertainment,
  • accessible in-flight movies,
  • captioning technology,
  • discrimination,
  • air travel for people with disabilities,
  • private right of action,
  • DOT regulations
Disciplines
Publication Date
January 18, 2012
Citation Information
Michael A Schwartz. "Propelling Aviation to New Heights: Accessibility to In-Flight Entertainment for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Passengers" ExpressO (2012)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/michaelschwartz/2/