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Article
Breaking down barriers: Academic obstacles of first-generation students at research universities
The Learning Assistance Review (2012)
  • Michael J. Stebleton, University of Minnesota - Twin Cities
  • Krista Soria
Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the perceived academic obstacles of first-generation (FG) students in comparison to non-FG students. Using the Student Experience in the Research University (SERU) completed by 58,000 students from six research universities, the researchers used nonparametric bootstrapping to analyze differences between first-generation and non-first-generation students’ obstacles to academic success. The results suggest that first-generation students more frequently encounter obstacles that compromise their academic success as compared to non-first-generation students, such as job responsibilities, family responsibilities, perceived weak English and math skills, inadequate study skills, and feeling depressed. Implications for learning assistance professionals are outlined.

Keywords
  • First Generation,
  • student success,
  • learning assistance
Publication Date
2012
Citation Information
Michael J. Stebleton and Krista Soria. "Breaking down barriers: Academic obstacles of first-generation students at research universities" The Learning Assistance Review Vol. 17 Iss. 2 (2012)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/michael_stebleton/3/