Skip to main content
Article
The Resilience of Self-Esteem in Late Adulthood
Journal of Aging and Health
  • Amy L. Collins, Boston College
  • Michael A. Smyer, Bucknell University
Publication Date
8-1-2005
Volume
17
Issue
4
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The authors examined the resilience of self-esteem after loss in the lives of older adults. Specifically, the authors investigated the relationship between loss and change in self-esteem during a 3-year period.

METHOD: A subsample of older adults (n = 1,278) from the Americans' Changing Lives Study was used to examine loss in the domains of health, financial security, or work and career and self-esteem before and after the loss.

RESULTS: There was a small but significant decrease in self-esteem between Wave I and Wave II of the study. Loss in one of the domains explained less than 1% of the variance in self-esteem change.

DISCUSSION: The low incidence of loss and small change in high levels of self-esteem are further evidence of resilience in older adults' psychological well-being. The implications for older adults' use of cognitive strategies to manage losses and promote gains are discussed.

Department
Psychology
Citation Information
Amy L. Collins and Michael A. Smyer. "The Resilience of Self-Esteem in Late Adulthood" Journal of Aging and Health (2005) p. 471 - 489
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/michael_smyer/66/