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Article
Tipping Customs and Status Seeking: A Cross-Country Study
Articles and Chapters
  • Michael Lynn, Cornell University
Publication Date
1-1-1997
Abstract

Tipping is a widespread custom in which service patrons give voluntary payments of money to the workers who have served them. This study found that tipping is more prevalent in countries the greater the value their citizens place on status/prestige. This finding suggests that tipping functions (in part) as a status display for consumers. Hospitality managers should keep this and other functions of tipping in mind when considering whether or not to permit tipping of their employees.

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Required Publisher Statement
© Elsevier. Final version published as: Lynn, M. (1997). Tipping customs and status seeking: A cross-country study. International Journal of Hospitality Management, 16(2), 221-224. Reprinted with permission. All rights reserved.

Citation Information

Lynn, M. (1997). Tipping customs and status seeking: A cross-country study [Electronic version]. Retrieved [insert date], from Cornell University, School of Hospitality Administration site: http://scholarship.sha.cornell.edu/articles/163