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Article
The Chicago Board of Education Desegregation Policies and Practices [1975-1985]: A Historical Examination of the Administrations of Superintendents Dr. Joseph P. Hannon and Dr. Ruth Love
Dissertations
  • Michael James, Loyola University Chicago
Date of Award
1-1-2009
Degree Type
Dissertation
Degree Name
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)
Department
School of Education
Abstract
The purpose of this study will be to examine the policies and practices of two distinguished superintendents of the Chicago Public Schools: Dr. Joseph P. Hannon and the first African American female Superintendent Dr. Ruth Love. Hannon's four year administration extended from 1975 through 1979. Love' administration encompassed the years 1980 through 1985. The individual administrative approaches used by both superintendents to desegregate the Chicago Public Schools will be discussed. In addition the administrator's effectiveness in equalizing educational opportunities for all students will be a primary focus. Inclusive in this study will be the administrator's development and use of grass roots strategies to empower the diverse communities of Chicago during the implementation of each desegregation plan. Through this grass roots initiative the citizenry of Chicago would have a voice and become active participants: participants who would contribute to the success of integrating the students and staff of the Chicago Public Schools. The various leadership styles of Dr. Joseph P. Hannon and Dr. Ruth Love were examined by utilizing the interpretative framework of Sergiovanni's five sources of authority.
Creative Commons License
Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0
Citation Information
Michael James. "The Chicago Board of Education Desegregation Policies and Practices [1975-1985]: A Historical Examination of the Administrations of Superintendents Dr. Joseph P. Hannon and Dr. Ruth Love" (2009)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/michael_james1/1/