Skip to main content
Article
Stress During Pregnancy Alters Rat Offspring Morphology and Ultrasonic Vocalizations
Physiology & Behavior
  • Michael T. Williams
  • Michael B. Hennessy, Wright State University - Main Campus
  • Harry N. Davis
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
2-1-1998
Abstract
Stress during pregnancy, or prenatal stress, is known to alter offspring behavior, morphology and physiology. We found that a heat, light and restraint stressor applied during the third trimester of pregnancy: 1) decreased the weight gain of adult female rats during pregnancy; 2) reduced the weight of pups, as well as the anogenital distance of male offspring, at birth; and 3) increased the number of ultrasonic vocalizations emitted by pups during isolation in a novel environment on Postnatal Day 14. These results closely approximate those we previously observed after peripheral administration of corticotropin-releasing factor to pregnant females during the third trimester. Together, the studies strongly suggest a role for corticotropin-releasing factor and/or other hormones of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal system in mediating some of the effects of gestational stress.
DOI
10.1016/S0031-9384(97)00428-9
Citation Information
Michael T. Williams, Michael B. Hennessy and Harry N. Davis. "Stress During Pregnancy Alters Rat Offspring Morphology and Ultrasonic Vocalizations" Physiology & Behavior Vol. 63 Iss. 3 (1998) p. 337 - 343 ISSN: 0031-9384
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/michael_hennessy/67/