Skip to main content
Article
Negative Moderating Effect of General Self-Efficacy on the Relationship between Need for Cognition and Cognitive Effort
Articles and Chapters
  • Kishore Gopalakrishna Pillai, University of Leeds
  • Ronald E. Goldsmith, Florida State University
  • Michael D. Giebelhausen, Cornell University
Publication Date
1-1-2011
Abstract

This study demonstrates the negative moderating effect of general self-efficacy on the relationship between need for cognition, which refers to stable individual differences in people's tendencies to engage in and enjoy cognitive activity, and cognitive effort. This negative moderating effect of general self-efficacy has been termed "plasticity." Scholars assume the relationship between need for cognition and cognitive effort is true by definition. The study uses data from 144 U.S. college students and employs moderated regression analysis followed by subgroup analysis to demonstrate plasticity. The results set a boundary condition to the generally presumed relationship between need for cognition and cognitive effort, thereby improving the understanding of how these phenomena are related.

Comments

Required Publisher Statement
© Ammons Scientific. Final version published as: Pillai, K., Goldsmith, R. E., & Giebelhausen, M. D. (2011). Negative moderating effect of general self-efficacy on the relationship between need for cognition and cognitive effort. Psychological Reports, 109(1), 127-136. Reprinted with permission. All rights reserved.

Citation Information

Pillai, K., Goldsmith, R. E., & Giebelhausen, M. D. (2011). Negative moderating effect of general self-efficacy on the relationship between need for cognition and cognitive effort [Electronic version]. Retrieved [insert date], from Cornell University, School of Hospitality Administration site: http://scholarship.sha.cornell.edu/articles/283