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Alternative Explanations for Changes in Similarity Judgments and MDS Structure
Articles and Chapters
  • Michael D Johnson, Cornell University School of Hotel Administration
  • Donald R. Lehmann, Columbia University
  • David A. Horne, University of Michigan
Publication Date
8-1-1990
Abstract

[Excerpt] The basic purpose of our paper (Johnson et al., 1990) was to see if the repetitive task of providing similarity judgments affects the cognitive structure evidenced by those judgments. The data clearly indicate that the structure changed through the course of the task. Moreover, this change is consistent with a categorization-based response to task fatigue. Three primary criticisms have been raised in response to our paper (Malhotra, 1990): (1) fatigue is not directly measured, (2) our hypotheses do not follow from our categorization framework, and (3) our hypotheses and findings are more consistent with a learning framework.

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Required Publisher Statement
© Elsevier. Final version published as: Johnson, M. D., Lehmann, D. R., & Horne, D. R. (1990). Alternative explanations for changes in similarity judgments and MDS structure. International Journal of Research in Marketing, 7(1), 53–56. Reprinted with permission. All rights reserved.

Citation Information

Johnson, M. D., Lehmann, D. R., & Horne, D. R. (1990). Alternative explanations for changes in similarity judgments and MDS structure[Electronic version]. Retrieved [insert date], from Cornell University, School of Hotel Administration site: http://scholarship.sha.cornell.edu/articles/683