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Article
Burnout among the addiction counseling workforce: The differential roles of mindfulness and values-based processes and worksite factors.
Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment
  • R. Vilardaga
  • J. B. Luoma
  • S. C. Hayes
  • J. Pistorello
  • Michael E. Levin, Utah State University
  • M. J. Hildebrandt
  • B. Kohlenberg
  • N. A. Roget
  • F. Bond
Document Type
Article
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
6-6-2011
Abstract

Although work-site factors have been shown to be a consistent predictor of burnout, the importance of mindfulness and values-based processes among addiction counselors has been little examined. In this study, we explored how strongly experiential avoidance, cognitive fusion, and values commitment related to burnout after controlling for well-established work-site factors (job control, coworker support, supervisor support, salary, workload, and tenure). We conducted a cross-sectional survey among 699 addiction counselors working for urban substance abuse treatment providers in six states of the United States. Results corroborated the importance of work-site factors for burnout reduction in this specific population, but we found that mindfulness and values-based processes had a stronger and more consistent relationship with burnout as compared with work-site factors. We conclude that interventions that target experiential avoidance, cognitive fusion, and values commitment may provide a possible new direction for the reduction of burnout among addiction counselors.

Citation Information
R. Vilardaga, J. B. Luoma, S. C. Hayes, J. Pistorello, et al.. "Burnout among the addiction counseling workforce: The differential roles of mindfulness and values-based processes and worksite factors." Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment Vol. 40 Iss. 1 (2011) p. 21 - 26
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/michael-levin/38/