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Article
Explanation and intergroup emotion: Social explanations as a foundation of prejudice-related compunction
Group Processes and Intergroup Relations
  • Michael J. Gill
  • Michael Andreychik, Fairfield University
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
1-1-2007
Abstract
Two studies examined whether social explanations—causal frameworks used to make sense of a group’s status and behavior—are associated with prejudice-related compunction. In Study 1, based on Devine, Monteith, Zuwerink, & Elliott, (1991), participants who endorsed external explanations (e.g. low socioeconomic status of Blacks stems from historical maltreatment) showed a particularly strong tendency to experience compunction in response to prejudice-related discrepancies. Study 2 involved a novel paradigm. Participants were induced to admit that they would discriminate against Black males. Conceptually replicating Study 1, endorsement of external explanations was positively associated with compunction in response to this imagined discrimination. Across both studies, there was also evidence that the effects of external explanations are not explicable in terms of internal motivation to avoid prejudice, global prejudice, or global positive evaluation of African Americans. Discussion centers on the importance of explanations in shaping intergroup emotions and how the concept of explanation links the intergroup emotion literature to other emotion literatures.
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Published Citation
Gill, M. J., & Andreychik, M. R. (2007). Explanation and intergroup emotion: Social explanations as a foundation of prejudice-related compunction. Group Processes and Intergroup Relations [Special Issue on Intergroup Emotion], 10(1), 87-106.
DOI
10.1177/1368430207071343
None
Peer Reviewed
Citation Information
Michael J. Gill and Michael Andreychik. "Explanation and intergroup emotion: Social explanations as a foundation of prejudice-related compunction" Group Processes and Intergroup Relations Vol. 10 Iss. 1 (2007)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/michael-andreychik/4/