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Presentation
Navigating the Complexity of Classroom Instruction: A Longitudinal Study of Thoughtfully Adaptive Teaching
American Educational Research Association 2010 Annual Meeting (2010)
  • Seth A. Parsons, George Mason University
  • B. Williams
  • Kathryn Kear, Binghamton University
  • Stephanie M. Davis, The University of North Carolina
  • Roya Q. Scales, Western Carolina University
  • Melony Holyfield Allen, University of North Carolina at Greensboro
  • Marianne Lawson, Binghamton University
  • Sarah Cohen, Lynbrook Elementary
Abstract
Teaching is extremely complex. Accordingly, researchers have suggested that effective teachers are thoughtfully adaptive. The empirical base for adaptive teaching, however, is limited. To address this gap in the literature, a research team has studied teachers’ adaptations for the last five years. Throughout this study, we have made methodological advances and found informative results. A careful examination of our findings across this longitudinal study has led to a broadening of our definitions and methods. This session shares what we have learned and where we are heading.
Keywords
  • Adaptive teaching,
  • Teaching,
  • Adaptations
Publication Date
May, 2010
Citation Information
Seth A. Parsons, B. Williams, Kathryn Kear, Stephanie M. Davis, et al.. "Navigating the Complexity of Classroom Instruction: A Longitudinal Study of Thoughtfully Adaptive Teaching" American Educational Research Association 2010 Annual Meeting (2010)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/melony-allen/13/