Skip to main content
Article
The psychology of interrogations and false confessions: Research and recommendations
Canadian Journal of Police & Security Services (2003)
  • Melissa B. Russano, Roger Williams University
Abstract
Instances of wrongful conviction in North America and Great Britain have uncovered numerous cases in which an innocent suspect has provided a false confession to a crime. As a result, social scientists have studied the interrogation process in an effort to understand the factors that may lead to such false confessions. In the present article, we review what is known about the psychology of police interrogations, including critical aspects of investigative bias, coercive interrogation techniques, and vulnerabilities of the suspect that can increase the likelihood of obtaining a false confession. We also discuss a novel alternative approach to the interrogation process that has recently been implemented in Great Britain, and propose preliminary directions for “best practice” in the interrogation of suspects.
Publication Date
2003
Citation Information
Melissa B. Russano. "The psychology of interrogations and false confessions: Research and recommendations" Canadian Journal of Police & Security Services (2003)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/melissa_russano/7/