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Article
Developmental Changes in Self-Perception: The Role of Gender in a Preadolescent Clinical Population
Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal (1996)
  • Melissa Lavitt, Arizona State University West
Abstract

Research indicates that gender and psychopathology are interrelated and that the nature of this relationship changes over the course of development. Rates of incidence for psychological distress reflect both gender and age differences. Furthermore, the expression of emotional problems is also related to gender. Some symptom patterns, for example, are more likely experienced by females than males. This study examines how psychological disturbance, operationalized as magnitude of symptomatology, interacts with development, or chronological age, in order to predict a child's self-perception. Forty-eight children involved in psychotherapy and their mothers were sampled for this research. It was found that for girls and not boys self-perception diminished with age. Results were interpreted in light of recent feminist theory on female development.

Publication Date
December, 1996
Citation Information
Melissa Lavitt. "Developmental Changes in Self-Perception: The Role of Gender in a Preadolescent Clinical Population" Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal Vol. 13 Iss. 6 (1996)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/melissa_lavitt/9/