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Presentation
Where The Tinder Was Lit: Archaeological Excavations at the Wesleyan Chapel, Women's Rights National Historical Park, Seneca Falls, New York
Council for Northeast Historical Archaeology Conference (2011)
  • Megan E. Springate, University of Maryland - College Park
Abstract
The Wesleyan Chapel, built in 1843, was the location of the First Women’s Rights Convention held in Seneca Falls, New York in 1848. It is now one of several significant structures that make up the Women’s Rights National Historical Park in Seneca Falls and Waterloo, New York. Over time, the form and the function of the Chapel building has changed – often dramatically. Archaeological investigations at the Wesleyan Chapel have revealed both the extent of these changes and information about the people associated with the property. Results of these excavations, particularly those conducted in 2008, are presented in the context of the site’s history and significance as the birthplace of the formal struggle for equal rights for women.
Publication Date
October, 2011
Citation Information
Megan E. Springate. "Where The Tinder Was Lit: Archaeological Excavations at the Wesleyan Chapel, Women's Rights National Historical Park, Seneca Falls, New York" Council for Northeast Historical Archaeology Conference (2011)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/meganspringate/16/