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Contribution to Book
Discipline and Desire: Feminist Politics, Queer Studies, and New Queer Anthropology
Mapping Feminist Anthropology in the Twenty-First Century (2016)
  • Margot Weiss
Abstract
This chapter situates contemporary queer anthropology within histories of the contested relationships between gender and sexuality, and feminist and queer studies. I begin with the delineation of gender as the domain of feminist studies, and sexuality as the domain of queer studies, staging a series of analogical readings of feminist and queer studies and their proper objects and political investments. I focus on two questions: the problematic of institutionalization (and the closure or fixity institutionalization represents) and the problematic of good enough objects—objects that might satisfy the political desires we have invested in them. Examining the political aspirations we invest in our disciplines, I explore how the desire to exceed the limits of institutionalization has sparked a critical queer studies that is attentive to both particularity and to a larger global context. Detouring through some of the new work in queer studies that, in my analysis, is compatible with cultural anthropology, I focus on the places where queer analytics aim to surpass proper objects and pat political interpretations. I conclude with a survey of what I term the “new queer anthropology,” which seeks to remake its objects and analytics by pushing its key terms—queer and anthropology—into uncharted territories.
Keywords
  • queer anthropology,
  • feminist anthropology,
  • feminist studies,
  • queer studies
Publication Date
2016
Editor
Ellen Lewin and Leni M. Silverstein
Publisher
Rutgers University Press
Citation Information
Margot Weiss (2016) "Discipline and Desire: Feminist Politics, Queer Studies, and New Queer Anthropology" in Ellen Lewin and Leni M. Silverstein (eds.), Mapping Feminist Anthropology in the Twenty-First Century. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press. pp. 168 - 187.