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Presentation
Comparative Masculinities: Why Islamic Indonesian Men are Great Mates and Australian Men are Girls
Faculty of Arts - Papers (Archive)
  • Mike Donaldson, University of Wollongong
  • P. Nilan, University of Newcastle
  • R. Howson, University of Wollongong
RIS ID
14144
Publication Date
29-6-2006
Publication Details
Donaldson, M, Nilan, P & Howson, R, Comparative Masculinities: Why Islamic Indonesian Men are Great Mates and Australian Men are Girls, Asia Reconstructed: From Critiques of Development to Postcolonial Studies - The 16th Biennial Conference of the Asian Studies Association of Australia, University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia, 26-29 June 2006.
Abstract
There may well be no known human societies in which some form of masculinity has not emerged as dominant, more socially central, more associated with power, in which a pattern of practices embodying the currently most honoured way of being male legitimates the superordination of men over women. This paper shows what a small sample of Indonesian men living in Australia thought of Australian masculinity, revealing much about hegemonic masculinity in Indonesia in the process, and disclosing some uncomfortable uniformities concerning men in both countries.
Citation Information
Mike Donaldson, P. Nilan and R. Howson. "Comparative Masculinities: Why Islamic Indonesian Men are Great Mates and Australian Men are Girls" (2006)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/mdonaldson/12/