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Malnutrition and poor food intake are associated with prolonged hospital stay, frequent readmissions, and greater in-hospital mortality: Results from the Nutrition Care Day Survey 2010
Faculty of Engineering and Information Sciences - Papers
  • Ekta Agarwal, University of Queensland
  • Maree Ferguson, University of Queensland
  • Merrilyn Banks, University of Queensland
  • Marijka Batterham, University of Wollongong
  • Judy Bauer, University of Queensland
  • Sandra Capra, University of Queensland
  • Elisabeth Isenring, University of Queensland
RIS ID
77240
Publication Date
1-1-2013
Publication Details

Agarwal, E., Ferguson, M., Banks, M., Batterham, M., Bauer, J., Capra, S. & Isenring, E. (2013). Malnutrition and poor food intake are associated with prolonged hospital stay, frequent readmissions, and greater in-hospital mortality: Results from the Nutrition Care Day Survey 2010. Clinical Nutrition, 32 (5), 737-745.

Abstract

Background & aims: The Australasian Nutrition Care Day Survey (ANCDS) ascertained if malnutrition and poor food intake are independent risk factors for health-related outcomes in Australian and New Zealand hospital patients.

Methods: Phase 1 recorded nutritional status (Subjective Global Assessment) and 24-h food intake (0, 25, 50, 75, 100% intake). Outcomes data (Phase 2) were collected 90-days post-Phase 1 and included length of hospital stay (LOS), readmissions and in-hospital mortality.

Results: Of 3122 participants (47% females, 65 ± 18 years) from 56 hospitals, 32% were malnourished and 23% consumed ≤ 25% of the offered food. Malnourished patients had greater median LOS (15 days vs. 10 days, p < 0.0001) and readmissions rates (36% vs. 30%, p = 0.001). Median LOS for patients consuming ≤ 25% of the food was higher than those consuming ≤ 50% (13 vs. 11 days, p < 0.0001). The odds of 90-day in-hospital mortality were twice greater for malnourished patients (CI: 1.09–3.34, p = 0.023) and those consuming ≤ 25% of the offered food (CI: 1.13–3.51, p = 0.017), respectively.

Conclusion: The ANCDS establishes that malnutrition and poor food intake are independently associated with in-hospital mortality in the Australian and New Zealand acute care setting.

Citation Information
Ekta Agarwal, Maree Ferguson, Merrilyn Banks, Marijka Batterham, et al.. "Malnutrition and poor food intake are associated with prolonged hospital stay, frequent readmissions, and greater in-hospital mortality: Results from the Nutrition Care Day Survey 2010" (2013)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/mbatterham/104/