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Article
Learning about one’s relative position and subjective well-being
Applied Economics (2007)
  • Maximo Rossi
  • Daniel Miles
Abstract

In this paper we show evidence which suggests that changes in an individual’s relative position affects his subjective well-being. In this sense, our findings are in line with those who argue that a felicity function should take into account both, absolute and relative position. Our result are based on a simple experimental design to discuss whether learning about one’s relative position affects subjective well-being. Additionally, using nonexperimental data we find a significant association between subjective well-being and relative wage.

Keywords
  • relative income,
  • subjective well-being
Disciplines
Publication Date
July, 2007
Citation Information
Maximo Rossi and Daniel Miles. "Learning about one’s relative position and subjective well-being" Applied Economics Vol. 39 Iss. 13 (2007)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/maximo_rossi/25/