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Presentation
Public Reporting of Courts’ Performance – how is this best achieved?
Address to the Asia Pacific Courts Conference 2013, “The Pursuit of Excellence and Innovation in Courts and Tribunals” (2013)
  • Matthew S.R. Palmer
Abstract

In this address Matthew Palmer suggests: 1 The disclosure of information, probably more information than the judiciary feels comfortable disclosing, in a simple, straightforward, unvarnished way, is essential to the medium term constitutional legitimacy of the judiciary. 2 Judges, public servants and politicians speak different languages. Recognising the differences is the first step to a better understanding of, and communication with, each other and, perhaps to mitigating the potential for constitutional conflicts to get out of hand. 3 It’s not constitutionally appropriate for the executive or legislative branches of government to decide, over the wishes of the judiciary, on the disclosure of the information of the judicial branch. 4 But, the judiciary would benefit from taking soundings, in a safe environment, with public servants and academics with different perspectives, on the reporting of information and other matters of judicial administration.

Keywords
  • judicial independence,
  • court performance,
  • constitutional law
Disciplines
Publication Date
March 9, 2013
Citation Information
Matthew S.R. Palmer. "Public Reporting of Courts’ Performance – how is this best achieved?" Address to the Asia Pacific Courts Conference 2013, “The Pursuit of Excellence and Innovation in Courts and Tribunals” (2013)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/matthew_palmer/36/