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Article
Noncontingent reinforcement as treatment for self-injury and food refusal and associated self-injury
Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis
  • David A. Wilder, Florida Institute of Technology
  • Matthew P. Normand, University of the Pacific
  • Julie Atwell, Florida Institute of Technology
Document Type
Article
Department
Psychology
DOI
10.1901/jaba.2005.132-04
Publication Date
12-1-2005
Abstract
We examined the use of noncontingent reinforcement to decrease self-injury and increase bite acceptance in a child who exhibited food refusal. First, a brief functional analysis suggested that self-injury was maintained by escape from food presentation. Next, we evaluated an intervention that involved noncontingent access to a video during feeding sessions. Results of the intervention showed a decrease in self-injury and an increase in bite acceptance.
Citation Information
David A. Wilder, Matthew P. Normand and Julie Atwell. "Noncontingent reinforcement as treatment for self-injury and food refusal and associated self-injury" Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis Vol. 38 Iss. 4 (2005) p. 549 - 553 ISSN: 0021-8855
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/matthew-normand/187/