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Academic Leaders and Faculty Developers: Creating an Institutional Culture that Values Teaching
To Improve the Academy (1994)
  • Mary Deane Sorcinelli, University of Massachusetts - Amherst
  • Norman D. Aitken
Abstract
In recent years, a great deal has been said and written about the need to improve teaching in the academy, especially in large research universities. College presidents, national associations representing higher education, private foundations, and individual faculty scholars all have challenged faculty, chairs, deans, campus administrators, and faculty developers to work together to improve support for undergraduate teaching and learning (Bok, 1986; Bowen & Schuster, 1986; Boyer, 1987; Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, 1989; Diamond & Adam, 1993; Seldin & Associates, 1990). Despite such calls for collaborative efforts to improve undergraduate education, faculty developers still often feel alone in a milieu that does not value teaching and frequently perceive a lack of support from academic leaders, particularly the central administration. Administrators, on the other hand, often recognize the need to improve institutional support for teaching, but are at a loss as to how to effectively intervene to change the environment.
Publication Date
January 1, 1994
Citation Information
Mary Deane Sorcinelli and Norman D. Aitken. "Academic Leaders and Faculty Developers: Creating an Institutional Culture that Values Teaching" To Improve the Academy Vol. 13 (1994)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/marydeane_sorcinelli/21/