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Article
When is a bystander not a bystander? A typology of the roles of bystanders in workplace bullying
ECU Publications 2012
  • Megan Paull
  • Maryam Omari, Edith Cowan University
  • Peter Standen, Edith Cowan University
Publication Date
1-1-2012
Document Type
Journal Article
Faculty
Faculty of Business and Law
School
School of Management
RAS ID
14144
Comments

This article was originally published as: Paull, M., Omari, M. , & Standen, P. P. (2012). When is a bystander not a bystander? A typology of the roles of bystanders in workplace bullying. Asia Pacific Journal of Human Resources, 50(3), 351-366. Original article available here

Abstract

The role of the bystander is one which has received only a small portion of the research attention that has been paid to workplace bullying. This paper will argue that bystanders are not just incidental but are an integral part of the context of bullying. Drawing on qualitative data from two separate studies, a typology is presented which outlines thirteen potential roles bystanders can take. This typology can be employed as an awareness-raising tool to encourage individuals to examine their own behaviour in a range of situations, and to acknowledge that their actions, either deliberate or inadvertent, can contribute to outcomes of events which may be classified as bullying. It also provides a foundation for further research into bystanders in workplace bullying.

Disciplines
Citation Information
Megan Paull, Maryam Omari and Peter Standen. "When is a bystander not a bystander? A typology of the roles of bystanders in workplace bullying" (2012)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/maryam_omari/9/